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Kidney transplantation and ischemic conditioning: past, present and future perspectives
Anesth Pain Med 2018;13(1):10-7
Published online January 31, 2018
© 2018 Korean Society of Anesthesiologists.

Hoon Jung
Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea
Correspondence to: Hoon Jung, M.D.
Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, 807 Hoguk-ro, Buk-gu, Daegu 41404, Korea
Tel: 82-53-200-2166
Fax: 82-53-200-2027
E-mail: wing2392@naver.com
ORCID
http://orcid.org/0000-0003-2488-5221
Received November 1, 2017; Revised December 14, 2017; Accepted December 14, 2017.
cc This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
Kidney transplantation is one of the treatments for the end-stage renal disease for various reasons. Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is an important mechanism of injury associated with acute rejection, delayed graft function, late graft failure, and graft loss in renal transplantation. Ischemic conditioning, which applies brief ischemia and reperfusion before, during, or after IRI is one of the protecting IRI strategies. Although animal studies have demonstrated the efficacy of IRI, the translation into beneficial clinical outcomes to humans is still controversial. By investigating the usefulness of ischemic conditioning in kidney transplantation in the present work, we aim to review overall ischemic conditioning and desire to predict the future of ischemic conditioning.
Key Words : Ischemia-reperfusion injury, Ischemic conditioning, Kidney, Transplantation.


January 2018, 13 (1)
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